Study of the Day

We keep “stealing” from the Inquirer but we can’t help it, it’s in our naycha. Or that seems to be the nature of blogging. Anyways, here’s a report from Vincent Cabreza about a study which found out that OFWs are a new power bloc in their communities. I’m sure you kinda know that already but it’s good to have your anecdotal evidence established by members of the academe. From the Inquirer:

Ngoddo’s study looked at how indigenous communities in Sadanga, Mt. Province, coped with modern life and a cash economy that “eroded” traditional community partnerships.

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Diaspora

Here’s a story written by a kailiyan which pretty much reflects the experience of thousands of Igorots/iCordilleras and millions of Filipinos who, despite their misgivings, end up working abroad. Our best wishes, Rolly.

Originally published in the Inquirer’s Youngblood section:

Patriotic doubts
By Rolly Allan Matinek

Little did I know that one day I would join the ranks of Filipinos dispersed around the world, who now make up more than 10 percent of the Philippine population. While it is no secret that most Filipinos harbor the desire to get out of the country in the hope of improving themselves and upgrading their socio-economic status and living standards (as well as that of their families), it was not really my “cup of tea”—as they say here in England—to work abroad.

On board an international flight with a one-way ticket, my priced laptop and my passport stamped with a foreign visa, I still could not believe that I had turned my back on my idealism. I love my country, especially my little town of Sagada in northern Philippines; and I consider myself a patriot. If I try giving this as a reason for not leaving the country to someone I meet on the street, I’d be met with rolling eyes and be called crazy. Every time a colleague or a friend left Philippine shores for the same job but with a much better compensation abroad, I wished him all the best, yet at the same time felt not a pang of envy, only sadness for the loss of one more talent.

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Laoagan Fund Update

From the Calgary Herald:

A fund set up by former co-workers to help homicide victim Arcelie Laoagan’s family has raised more than $100,000.

The money will be used to set up a monthly income for family in the Philippines left without support after she was killed in Calgary on Jan. 18.

Laoagan left behind five children, from elementary-school age to young adults, and husband Gregorio Laoagan.

“We’re just overwhelmed and so appreciative of all the donations,” said Jane Mugford, the vice-president of technology at West Canadian, a graphics company where Laoagan worked. “We’ve had people walk in off the street and donate.”

Donations have come from all over Calgary, across Canada and even Australia, she said.

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Laoagan Trust Fund

Kudos to Arcelie Laoagan’s employer, Western Canadian, for setting up a trust fund for Arcelie. According to the company, the fund raised “will be used to cover funeral expenses and transportation costs to the Philippines which will total about $15,000. Donations surpassing the $15,000 mark will be put into an account for Arcelie’s children to help continue her dream of bringing her boys to Canada.”

To date over $20,000 have been donated to the fund. Visit West Canadian’s site to see how you can contribute.

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