Are You a Limahong Descendant?


Legend has it that Limahong, the Chinese pirate who raided Manila back in the 1500s, escaped to the Cordilleras when Spanish/Filipino soldiers regrouped to kick his ass out of the capital.

According to the legend, Limahong and his band of pirates sought refuge in the Cordilleras and married the local women. This supposedly explains why a lot of Igorots have some East Asian features. See above photos for instance.

Continue reading

Boon Award: The Ibaloi Dictionary Project

We are giving our next Boon “You Are Doing a Good Thing” Award to the people behind the Ibaloi Dictionary Project. We learned about this project from the blog of our good friend, Danilova Molintas.

So why are we giving a Boon Award to this group? Because instead of simply crying about the fact that their language might die (and we must admit that this blog is also guilty of this “crying but doing nothing else” thing), the group is actually doing something to address the problem. Let’s hope that the other ehtno-linguistic groups in the Cordillera will follow suit.

From Cemarban’s comment in Dani’s blog, we learn more about the people behind this worthy endeavor:
Continue reading

Philippine Nikkeijin 2007

Hey you, Manila based readers. Are you looking for interesting things to do? Then check out the following activities of Philippine Nikkeijin 2007. In case you are wondering, Nikkeijin refers to the descendants of Japanese immigrants to the Philippines (and other countries).

A significant number of Nikkeijins are in the Cordilleras where Japanese workers who were hired to help build Kennon, Halsema, etc. settled and married the locals.

Anyways, check out the following events organized by the University of the Philippines Asian Center, the UP Vargas Museum, The Japan Foundation, National Commission for Culture and the Arts, and Filipino-Japanese Foundation of Northern Luzon, Inc. Our thanks to Michiyo Yoneno-Reyes for sending us the information.

Continue reading